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, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in which the wall street dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize s
. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world gr
scientology, hollywood and a prison of belief and bob minzesheimer is looking forward to ross perot and all gore, and should point* out to general stanley mcchrystal has a book my share of the task and exchange line coronary disease. teeeighteen and bob minzesheimer we appreciate your time today. . . almost nine years later she has a book and i'm still on the show. >> 100 chicken recipes with 50 vegetarian and you know i said i have to -- and what i've learned is chicken is the most fertile -- versatile ingredient you can use in the kitchen. you can do anything to it. you can bake it, rustic, barbecue it, just amazing. >> lorraine wallace are these are recipes? >> all of my recipes and they been tried and tested and it's what i love to do. >> i am the tester. i have not cooked any of them but i had eaten everyone. >> it has family stories, family recipes and a family tip that about a. >> can you give us a little background on you two, how long you have been married? >> we have six children and we have been together for 16 years. >> but i have to say if the old-fashioned way. i had f
to the senator about that. first, we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has beco
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
that is being managed by the real bob sullivan. the genius on the other side of the hudson. let's welcome bob sullivan. >> so, let's cut to the chase. everything san know everything there is to know. >> i am thinking of all the result is ino, and most of them he knew first. there are a lot of our solvents. it might not be me here tonight. thank you so much. we should stop right there. i'm so happy. and also -- >> that's fine. i can read from your book. >> it would be a better night. i know that it would be a better night. when i write books it is how long can you put off not writing the book. i won't write down one. and then a couple of books or ideas keep coming back. there are a lot of them, but i couldn't beat it down. the air about the war. it's foggy. the other project that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to dis
that we need a dialogue and much of the time whether it is bob costas getting in trouble or the doctors in florida told they can't talk about it or the military saying they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical we need to deal with this issue because it's important. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: i've always felt the gun control side that we want to talk and maybe the other side doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get to this table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out and get some sense -- good to talk to you. that was "after words" book tv signature program - which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv, at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. ago to booktv.org and click on "after words" and the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> with a month left in 2012,
of the time of its bob costas kidded tripler doctors in florida or the military saying they can't talk about it were people going hysterical, we need to do with this issue. >> guest: we do what i hope we will. so far so to come. >> host: i've always felt that the gun-control side who want to talk, but i want to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. >> guest: thank you for the discussion. >> dallas "after words" in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with material. "after words" airs every week and on booktv, 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch online. go to booktv.org and click on afterwards and mysterious and topics list only if the recited page. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors embracing investigative reporting. the point be seen over the years is not just economics. it's a discomfort investigative reporting causes in the newsroom because his troubled
of the time whether it's bob costas getting in trouble for talking about it or doctors in florida told they can't talk about are the military told they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical, we need to do -- deal with this issue. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: again the gun control side we want to talk and maybe that their site doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. thank you for the discussiodiscussio n. >> guest: good to talk to you. >> that was supple and booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists public year's legislatolegislato rs and others familiar with their material. after words airs every weekend at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9:00 p.m. on sunday -- though you can also watch on line. go to booktv.org incorporated click on supple and in the topics list on the upper right side of the page.
provide greater efficiencies. we were able -- bob gates before me begin that effort, achieved about, i believe about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that, in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now, and i asked, i asked that question when he first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary, vis-À-vis the service chief? and the reality is that there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. but having said that, there are a hell of a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon, and we will. >> as the defense department deals with the downsizing the services, have you considered cuts to the number of flag and general officers? >> you know, again i think, i think that's part and parcel of, as you do force reduct
as brief as you can. >> yes, bob rohr, british medical journal. most of the talk about has been the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done, say, on these changes on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to cover these additional costs for an extended period of time? my hypothesis is that it would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employer receiving and providing insurance. then on the consumer side, how would these increased costs affect access to care and probably quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, identify actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that extending the medicare eligibility age would hasten the point in which employers might not offer coverage at all. what i with was trying to indicate earlier was that for the vast majority of employers outside of the industries where retiree health might be highly concentrated, the effect of the medicare eligibility age would be
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
and keep your question as brief as you can. >> yes, bob with british medical journal. most of the talk it's been about impact on the federal budget and balancing one versus another. what analysis has been done on the exchanges, on the impact of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? by hypothesis would be that they would make them less employable in some ways. either that, or takes away from employers providing insurance. on the consumer side, how is it that these increased costs affect access to care and quality of care? >> paul, do you want to start the first part of that? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest that any of the medicare eligibility age would increase where employers would not offer coverage at all. for the vast majority of them, employers outside of industries where retiree health plans are highly concentrated, in fact the medicare eligibility age would be large in some employees would continue in the workforce longer because of the subsidies
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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